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Viking home life revolved around work.

 

Because they lived in hard conditions and had to grow or hunt for all of their food there was always something to be done.

 

Most men would have had good DIY skills and would make running repairs around the home as needed, as well as being proficient sailors and warriors in order to serve their Jarl and protect their family.

The men would also specialise in a certain skill - pottery, leather work, stone masonry, boat building and metal working were common trades.

 

Men were also farmers and would share the chores with the women and slaves. Hunting and fishing were skills that every boy would learn from a young age.

Families lived in Longhouses - these were made of something called 'wattle & daub' (a mixture of hay, twigs and mud) and the roofs would have been thatched or covered in turf to keep in the heat.

 

There would be very little furniture in ordinary houses as people tended to sit and sleep on animal skins on raised earthen platforms. Cooking would be done over a central fire that was situated in the middle of the room with a hole above it in the roof to let out the smoke.

 

These houses had no windows to keep heat in but it did mean that they would get very smoky!

Richer houses would contain tables and chairs as well as wall hangings and tapestries.

 

They would still normally have a central fire that would make the whole place smoky and unpleasant to our modern eyes but probably nice and cosy for the Vikings!

Most of the implements used in the house such as plates, cups and spoons would have been made of wood but it was also common to use pottery, horn and even (if you were wealthy enough to import such things) glass!

Give me a nice central heating system any day. This goblin likes comfort!

Viking Longhouse Wattle and Daub wall

A wattle and daub wall

Animal hide

Animal skin to sleep on

Viking hunting Viking Fishing

Hunting

Fishing